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Content provided by the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance
19.415 Professional and Cultural Exchange Programs - Citizen Exchanges

AUTHORIZATION:

The Fulbright-Hays Act of 1961, Public Law 87-256.
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As authorized by the Fulbright-Hays Act, the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) seeks to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries by means of educational and cultural exchange programs, including the exchange of scholars, researchers, professionals, students, and educators. ECA programs foster engagement and encourage dialogue with citizens around the world. Educational and cultural engagement is premised on the knowledge that mutual understanding, the development of future leaders, and the benefits of education programs influence societies and affect official decision-making almost everywhere in the world today. ECA programs inform, engage, and influence participants across strategic sectors of society � including young people, women, teachers, scholars, journalists, and other professionals � increasing the number of foreign individuals who have first-hand experience with Americans and with the values of freedom, representative government, rule of law, economic choice, and individual dignity, while building international knowledge and capacity among Americans. The purpose of Citizen Exchange programs is to support professional, youth, sports and cultural exchange programs between the United States and other countries through grants and cooperative agreements to American non-profit, non-governmental institutions and organizations, including community organizations, professional associations, and universities.

TYPES OF ASSISTANCE:

Project Grants
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USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS:

Funding is provided to eligible non-profit organizations, colleges and universities to support their work in designing and administering programs as well as coordinating program logistics. Funding to those organizations supports activities such as publicity and recruitment, screening of participant applications, communication with participants, domestic and international travel, payment of stipends and program benefits, and the provision of enrichment activities. Citizen Exchanges constitute a range of professional, youth, sports and cultural exchange programs designed to promote priority U.S. interests around the world by developing mutual understanding of key issues and promoting long-lasting ties between the United States and other countries. Programs are designed to promote good governance, civil society and civic responsibility, public health, conflict prevention and management, women�s empowerment, trade, environmental awareness and responsibility, leadership, arts management, cultural diversity and heritage, sports education, and educational reform, as well as other topics through people-to-people exchanges. Please refer to the grants.gov or Federal Register announcement for further information.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

Applicant Eligibility:   To public and private nonprofit organizations meeting the provisions described in IRS regulation 26CFR 1.501(c).

Beneficiary Eligibility:   U.S. citizens and foreign nationals.

Credentials/Documentation:   Pursuant to the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, as amended (Fulbright-Hays Act) the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the U.S. Department of State awards grants and cooperative agreements to educational and cultural public or private nonprofit foundations or institutions. Applications may be submitted by public and private non-profit organizations meeting the provisions described in Internal Revenue Code section 26 USC 501(c)(3). Organizations must have nonprofit status with the IRS at the time of application. Please refer to the grants.gov or Federal Register announcement for further eligibility criteria. OMB Circular No. A-87 applies to this program.

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APPLICATION AND AWARD PROCESS:
Pre-application Coordination:   Preapplication coordination is not applicable. Environmental impact information is not required for this program. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372.

Application Procedure:   OMB Circular No. A-102 applies to this program. OMB Circular No. A-110 applies to this program. Announcements are made on the grants.gov website and in the Federal Register for organizations meeting eligibility requirements. Announcements are made throughout the fiscal year and are posted to the Department of State's website: http://exchanges.state.gov/grants/open2.html. The application procedures are described in the grants.gov and Federal Register announcements.

Award Procedure:   Final awards cannot be made until funds have been appropriated by Congress, allocated and committed through internal Bureau procedures. Successful applicants will receive a Federal Assistance Award (FAA) from the Bureau�s Grants Office. The FAA and the original proposal with subsequent modifications (if applicable) shall be the only binding authorizing document between the recipient and the U.S. Government. The FAA will be signed by an authorized Grants Officer, and mailed to the recipient�s responsible officer identified in the application.

Deadlines:   Not Applicable.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time:   

From 90 to 120 days.

Appeals:   

Not Applicable.

Renewals:   

As stated in the Grants.gov and Federal Register announcements.

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ASSISTANCE CONSIDERATIONS:

Formula and Matching Requirements:   

This program has no statutory formula.
Matching requirements are not applicable to this program.
MOE requirements are not applicable to this program.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance:   

As stated in the Grants.gov and Federal Register announcements. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: Through the Department's central financial management database.

POST ASSISTANCE REQUIREMENTS:

Reports:   As stated in the Grants.gov and Federal Register announcements. Cash reports are not applicable. Progress reports are not applicable. As stated in the Grants.gov and Federal Register announcements. As stated in the Grants.gov and Federal Register announcements.

Audits:   In accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular No. A-133 (Revised, June 27, 2003), "Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations," nonfederal entities that expend financial assistance of $500,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Nonfederal entities that expend less than $500,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in Circular No. A-133. The Recipient must comply with the OMB audit requirements. For all DOS awards, regardless of business type, the Recipients are subject to the audit requirements found in OMB audit requirements. In addition, the Recipients are subject to the audit requirements found in the Single Audit Act of 1984, 31 U.S.C. 7501-7507. Please refer to the Department of State Standard Terms and Conditions for Domestic Financial Assistance Awards (http://fa.statebuy.state.gov ) for additional guidance.

Records:   The Recipients must maintain financial records, supporting documents, statistical records, and all other records pertinent to an award for a period of three years from the date of submission of the final expenditure report. Please refer to the Department of State Standard Terms and Conditions for Domestic Financial Assistance Awards (http://fa.statebuy.state.gov ) for additional guidance.

FINANCIAL INFORMATION:

Account Identification:  

19-0201-0-1-154.

Obligations:   (Project Grants) FY 08 $69,396,000; FY 09 est $69,396,000; FY 10 est $0 - FY2010 estimate not available.

Range and Average of Financial Assistance:  

$100,000 to $16,135,646.

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PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS:
Fiscal Year 2015: Fiscal Year 2015: The Professional Fellows program supports young professionals in specific fields from countries around the globe to undergo internships at businesses, NGOs and government offices in the United States for three-four weeks, and sends their American counterparts overseas for follow-on programming. There were approximately 183 U.S. participants and approximately 518 non-U.S. participants in FY 2015.

The Community Solutions program supports young professionals in specific fields from countries around the globe to undergo leadership training and four-month internships at NGOs and government offices in the United States to experience firsthand the interaction between the government and non-profit sector to enact change in local communities. There were approximately 100 non-U.S. participants and approximately 5 U.S. participants in FY 2015.

TechWomen empowers women engaged in science and technology from select countries in Africa, Central Asia and the Middle East through networking activities and month-long mentorships where they are matched with women at leading science, tech and innovation companies in Silicon Valley and the San Francisco Bay Area, and through outreach projects to women and girls overseas. There were approximately 90 non-U.S. participants in FY 2015.

The Fortune/State Department Global Women�s Mentoring Partnership develops the management and business skills of emerging women leaders from countries around the world through month-long mentorships in the United States where they are matched with senior women executives in the fields of business, law, non-profit management and sports. There were approximately 13 non-U.S. participants in FY 2015.

The Traditional Public-Private Partnerships are long-standing programs to support the Bureau�s commitment to work with the U.S. NGO community to implement cooperative international exchange projects. There were approximately 106 U.S. participants, and approximately 141 non-U.S. participants in FY 2015.

The National Youth Science Camp encourages the most talented science-inclined high school students to achieve their full potential. ECA supports the participation students from other countries in the Western Hemisphere in this month-long camp. There were approximately 16 non-U.S. participants in FY 2015.

The International Sports Programming Initiative supports educational exchanges designed to foster mutual understanding and help start a dialogue at the grassroots level among American youth and youth from around the world through participation in sports. There were approximately 131 U.S. participants, and approximately 159 non-U.S. participants in FY 2015.

The Global Sports Mentoring Program is comprised of two distinct programs: 1) Empowering Women and Girls Through Sports promotes participation in sports while fostering mutual understanding among the youth of the United States and those from countries representing all world regions through mentorships, sports visitor and sports envoy program. There were approximately 20 U.S. participants, and approximately 20 non-U.S. participants in FY 2015. 2) The Sport for Community mentorship focuses on emerging leaders in disability sport in the Western Hemisphere. There were approximately 15 U.S. participants, and approximately 15 non-U.S. participants in FY 2015.

The Future Leaders Exchange (FLEX) program promotes mutual understanding between the United States and the countries of Eurasia by providing scholarships for high school students to live in the United States for an academic year. There were approximately 880 non-U.S. participants in FY 2015.

The Kennedy-Lugar Youth Exchange and Study (YES) program promotes mutual understanding between the United States and countries with significant Muslim populations by providing scholarships for high school students to live in the United States for an academic year. There were approximately 900 non-U.S. participants in FY 2015.

Through the Kennedy-Lugar Youth Exchange and Study Abroad (YES Abroad) program, American high school participants from across the United States study for up to eleven months in select countries in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Middle East. There were approximately 65 U.S. participants in FY 2015.

Youth Leadership Programs foster greater understanding and respect between the people of the United States and other countries, to develop leadership skills and a sense of civic responsibility among teenagers and educators. There were approximately 461 non-U.S. participants and 123 U.S. participants in FY 2015.

The Youth Leadership On Demand Program provides high school students and adult educators from countries identified as Department priorities the opportunity to explore civic education, youth leadership development, and community service in the United States. There were approximately 40 non-U.S. participants in FY 2015.

TechGirls is an educational exchange initiative for teenage girls from the Middle East and North Africa that focuses on promoting the high-level study of technology while fostering mutual understanding among the youth of the United States and the countries and territories of this region. There were approximately 27 non-U.S. participants in FY 2015.

The American Youth Leadership Program provides high school students and educators from the United States the opportunity to travel abroad on a three- to four-week-long exchange program to gain firsthand knowledge of foreign cultures and to collaborate on solving global issues. There were approximately 122 U.S. participants in FY 2015.

The Youth Ambassadors Program provides high school students and educators the opportunity to explore civic education, community service, and leadership through three-week exchanges between the United States and Latin America. There were approximately 76 U.S. participants, and approximately 308 non-U.S. participants in FY 2015.

The Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange program (CBYX) was inaugurated in 1983 through a bilateral agreement between the U.S. Congress and the German Bundestag. The program celebrates German-American friendship based on common values of democracy and creates lasting personal and institutional relationships through an academic year school and home stay experience for American and German high school students and vocational school graduates. There were approximately 350 U.S. participants, and approximately 360 non-U.S. participants in FY 2015.

Designed to increase the number of Americans who learn foreign languages that are critical to advancing U.S. national interests, the National Security Language Initiative for Youth (NSLI-Y) program provides scholarships to American high school students for overseas intensive language programs in Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), Hindi, Korean, Persian, Russian, and Turkish. There were approximately 610 U.S. participants in FY 2015.

The Emerging Young Leaders Award supports international youth through an intensive, three-week program in the United States focused on the themes of peacebuilding and conflict prevention, democracy and governance, and advanced leadership development, in order to recognize and support young people who have shown the tenacity and courage to create positive and impactful change in challenging environments while also increasing public participation in, and public information about, social change and tolerance. There were approximately 10 non-U.S. participants in FY 2015.

The International Writing Program is a five-part international exchange of writers who participate in a residency program at the University of Iowa, which also hosts the Between the Lines program, and supports residency programs focused on creative writing. American writers conduct public policy-related reading, lecture and teaching tours in several priority overseas countries with limited access to creative writing courses. There were approximately 20 U.S. traveling participants, and approximately 47 non-U.S. traveling participants in FY 2015.

The American Film Showcase (AFS) presents award-winning independent American documentaries and narrative films and their filmmakers to audiences around the world, offers contemporary insights into American life and culture, and explores issues affecting democratic societies. There were approximately 80 U.S. participants, and approximately 12 foreign traveling participants in FY 2015.

The American Music Abroad Program is designed to bring American music and culture to audiences around the globe through person-to-person exchanges. U.S. musical groups engage with foreign audiences through workshops, master classes, jam sessions, and performances to present a positive image of the United States and provide a greater understanding of our society. There were approximately 40 U.S. participants in FY 2015.

Through DanceMotion USA, American dance companies tour approximately nine overseas countries in three world regions, selected based on U.S. foreign policy interests, to present workshops, master classes and performances in the following American dance genres: contemporary, jazz, ballet, tap/or step and hip hop. There were approximately 33 U.S. participants in FY 2015.

OneBeat is an international music exchange program that fosters musical collaboration and social engagement through residency and tour activities through two components over two years: OneBeat U.S. convenes musicians who form small ensembles to collaborate, compose new music, record, conduct workshops with youth, and perform in diverse spaces and community-driven organizations. OneBeat Abroad translates the basic components of the OneBeat U.S. model into two smaller, more compact versions that take place in two different international cities. There were approximately 8 U.S. participants, and approximately 27 foreign traveling participants in FY 2015.

American Arts Incubator is an arts-based international people-to-people exchange through which American artists travel to five different countries for three to four weeks to implement a community-based art and micro grant program for new media art projects, in order to promote women�s empowerment, conflict resolution, and environmental protection. There were approximately 5 U.S. participants in FY 2015.

Next Level is an arts-based international people-to-people exchange that supports and furthers U.S. Department of State foreign policy objectives by sending professional American hip hop artists to visit five select countries and implement multi-disciplinary workshops in music production, beat making, break dancing and rapping as a way to reach out to underserved youth and promote conflict resolution. There were approximately 20 U.S. participants, and approximately 5 foreign traveling participants in FY 2015. Fiscal Year 2016: No Current Data Available. Fiscal Year 2017: No Current Data Available.

REGULATIONS, GUIDELINES, AND LITERATURE:

As stated in the Grants.gov or GrantSolutions.gov announcements. In addition, organizations should be familiar with OMB Circular 2 CFR Parts 200 and 600, entitled the Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards. For a copy of the OMB circular cited, please contact the U.S. Government Publishing Office or download from www.ecfr.gov website.

INFORMATION CONTACTS:

Regional or Local Office:   None.

Headquarters Office:  

Sheila Casey - Department of State
Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs
Office of Citizen Exchange Programs
2200 C Street, NW
SA-05, Rm. 3B14, Washington,
District of Columbia 20037
Email: caseysd@state.gov
Phone: (202) 632-6070

Web Site Address:  
http://eca.state.gov/about-bureau-0/organizational-structure/office-citizen-exchanges

EXAMPLES OF FUNDED PROJECTS:

Not Applicable.

CRITERIA FOR SELECTING PROPOSALS:

As stated in the Grants.gov and Federal Register announcements.

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